mGa KuRo-KuRo Ni Ka UrO

Monday, May 23, 2005

Lost in Translation (Naligaw sa Pagsalin)

Got this from my friend Nandy via email. It’s a list of job positions in English and their translations in Tagalog. I’m only listing a few.
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Auditor
Business Manager
Public Relations Officer
Observer
Advocate
Spokesman
Moderator
Enforcer
Assistant
Adviser
Consultant
Contractor
Technical Writer
Headhunter
Chief Accountant
Purchaser
Receptionist
Watchman
Doorman
Comedian
Entertainer
Pasimuno
Kunsintidor
Palsipikador
Kubrador
Kasabwat
Gastador
Tsismoso
Usisero
Taga-batikos
Bolero
Taga-bulabog
Tirador
Galamay
Sulsol
Manggagancho
Estapador
Manlilinlang
Taga-silat
Punong-Gahaman
Palengkera
Palikera
Istambay
Nagpapalusot
Alaskador
Kerengkeng


We Pinoys are really a fun and unique people. Lahat ng bagay nabibigyan natin ng katatawanan. I was beginning to wonder if it is only us Pinoys who are able to use our language to such humorous effect. I mean, I couldn’t imagine the above translations being done in Japanese, Chinese, German, or any other language.

Remember our jokes that start with “Ano sa Hapon (or Intsik, German, bahala ka nang mamili) ang (kung anuman yon)?”, I have yet to hear a version of it in English. If ever there is one, still, I can’t imagine it being as funny as our Pinoy version.

Actually, marami talagang unique sa ating kultura. Our brand of humor, isa lang yon. When we live in another country we need to assimilate with their culture, and yet we should not forget ours. We need to adopt the best from both cultures, but discard what's bad. Retaining our own style of humor?...I find nothing wrong with that.

Tanong: Ano sa NZ ang "goodbye" o "see you"? Sagot: "Ka kite". Totoo yan, hindi joke. :)

6 Comments:

  • Ka Uro,
    Naalala ko tuloy bigla iyong isa pang joke tungkol sa mahirap at mayaman, here goes....kapag mayaman "allergies", kapag mahirap "galis"; kapag mayaman "playgirl", kapag mahirap "malandi"; kapag mayaman at naparami ang kain sa handaan "he/she just loves the food" and it is taken as a compliment by the chef, kapag mahirap "PATAY GUTOM"..nyahahahaha

    By Blogger Rhada, at 1:53 AM, May 24, 2005  

  • Hi Rhada,
    Kakatuwa. hahaha. but it made me think as well how our choice of words could be dependent on the social class to reflect our prejudices. very interesting.

    By Blogger Ka Uro, at 12:29 PM, May 24, 2005  

  • KA URO, masasabi ko lang related to sa entry ko pero mas serious nga lang yung post ko, nagtutugma talaga tayo. Naka-plano kasi akong magpost rin nito dahil nabasa ko last week ang "WIT OF THE FILIPINO by Nury Vittachini". Share ko nalang dito, nauna ka eh...

    People in the Philippines also redesign English to be more efficient. "The creative confusion between language and culture leads to more than just simple unintentional errors in syntax, but in the adoption of new words," says reader Rob Goodfellow. He came across a sign that said "House Fersallarend." Why use five words (house for sale or rent) when two will do?

    Tonyboy Ongsiako explains why there was so much wit in the Philippines. "We come from a country where you require a sense of humour to survive," he says, "We have a 24-hour comedy show here called the government and a huge reserve of comedians made up mostly of politicians and bad actors."

    By Blogger TEACHER SOL, at 1:01 PM, May 24, 2005  

  • Mam Sol,

    yung sinabi ni Tonyboy, that's the best explanation i've heard.

    i look forward to your post.

    By Blogger Ka Uro, at 1:10 PM, May 24, 2005  

  • Naalala ko rin bigla yung mga joke tungkol sa palakihan at pagalingan ng iba't ibang bansa, syempre panalo lagi ang pinoy, hehee.
    ano sa intsik ang kulangot? CHAMPOY!!!

    By Blogger Tanggero, at 4:07 PM, May 24, 2005  

  • demonyo ka talaga, tanggers. paborito ko pa naman ang champoy. paano pa ako makakakain ngayon ng champoy?

    By Blogger Ka Uro, at 10:19 PM, May 24, 2005  

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